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Which are world’s 10 largest stock markets by market capitalization? January 24, 2007

Posted by deminvest in dictionary for democratic investors, investment, investment strategies, nasdaq, stock faq.
26 comments

[newer data available thanks to Kian]

That interesting (or stupid?) question came to my mind. I don’t know how. The Internet has its special way to hide from you figures that matter, and flood you with detailed, plentiful, useless numbers. So All I could find are the figures of year 2000.

The world’s 10 largest stock markets by market capitalisation at the end of 2000
(in $ million)

1 United States 15,104,037
2 Japan 3,157,222
3 United Kingdom 2,576,992
4 France 1,446,634
5 Germany 1,270,243
6 Canada 841,385
7 Switzerland 792,316
8 Italy 768,364
9 Netherlands 640,456
10 Hong Kong 623,398

Those numbers are the best I could get on-line.

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Why we, the people, should never average down any stock January 23, 2007

Posted by deminvest in dictionary for democratic investors, HOKU Scientific, investment, investment strategies, My investing mistakes.
3 comments

It is such a temptation. We feel so well when we take an “Average down” shot. But it can be lethal for our wallet. Let’s see what it is:

To average down = to buy more shares of a stock which somebody already holds and which has dropped in price since the earlier purchase . When somebody does so the average price paid for each share goes down.

Example: (more…)

What are “Call Options” and “Put Options”? When should I buy them? October 15, 2006

Posted by deminvest in Call options, dictionary for democratic investors, investment, investment strategies, Social investing, stock faq.
2 comments

If you expect a rise of a stock, or of an index, you should buy a Call Option liked to it.

If you expect a rise the fall of a stock, or of an index, you should buy a Put Option liked to it.
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What does Qtrly Earnings Growth mean on Yahoo Finance stats and on other finance sites? August 31, 2006

Posted by deminvest in dictionary for democratic investors, investment, stock faq.
3 comments

Yahoo Finance is Internet’s main source of information and data on stocks. The most important page that Yahoo Finance has about each stock is the “Key Statistics” page. On this page one of the most important numbers, which I always consider before deciding to buy a stock, is:

Qtrly Earnings Growth (yoy): stands for Quarterly Earnings Growth (year on year). It is a percentage measure of the growth of earnings in the last quarter reported, compared to the earnings of the same quarter of the previous year.

What is Qtrly Earnings growth?Hugh? Not so simple to understand without an example:

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What is the meaning of YoY for stocks? Simply Year on Year! June 7, 2006

Posted by deminvest in dictionary for democratic investors, ebay, investment, Single stocks, stock faq, stock I own, stock ratios, stocks.
3 comments

Often in our little discussions we use some symbols related to stocks. YoY (or yoy) means Year on Year. It compares a certain comany perforamance figure  between this year and the previous year. Example: (more…)

“Sell earn and cry” investment strategy for desperate proletarians. May 9, 2006

Posted by deminvest in Blogroll, dictionary for democratic investors, investment, investment strategies, Social investing.
10 comments

"Sell earn and cry" investment strategy is not something I invented. It is something I read about somewhere, which is unfortunately very good for desperate proletarian investors and true even for affluent big investors.

Now, to understand better, let's imagine one of us proletarians of the third millennium who invested $1000 and made the stock pick of his/her life: he or she sees the stock price skyrocket so fast that it doubles in 2 months. What luck! But…

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Payout Ratio: important word for the democratic investor’s dictionary. March 10, 2006

Posted by deminvest in dictionary for democratic investors, Dogs of the Dow, investment, Social investing, stocks.
1 comment so far

We, the people, like very much dividends. But we only like dividends that continue to grow in the future. Payout Ratio can help you figure out what may happen to dividends in the future. (more…)

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