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About

The proletarian investor is someone who has understood that in today’s global economy the only way to take the means of productions off the hands of few rich and selfish capitalists, is to invest on the capital markets globally and, by the great numbers, make the few rich irrilevant.

As Marx said, today thanks to the global financial markets, we have the way to own the “means of productions” we can own part of the company where we work and punish them by selling teir stock if they misbehave. We can own the company which is selling us goods, and dump it if it stops doing goods we like.
Today consumers and voters (the modern proletarians) are lead by sophisticated marketing techiques, which basically are are the modern way of lying. The are so advanced and sophisticated that it is very hard to dectect a politician who is lying or a product which is not good before trying it. And they are so sophisticated that two different voters will vote for different candidates both of them believing that they are choosing the person who will help them better. With two canditas lying what really matters is who has more money to lye better. The money comes from companies and by owning them we can even influence a better political process.
Of course it is important to chose the right investments, to support the right company and to increase the wealth of the proletarian investors to make him more powerful and able to give his or her contribute to the decision which really do matter to day. Global decision based on numbers.

More than that, the markets are not racist and sexist. Actually women, living longer than man and usually receiving their heritage, have on average more investment power than men.

So let’s get down on our computer and decide together how to invest our money thus making Democracy stronger and the proletarians less poor.

Comments»

1. Carlana Martin - May 18, 2006

I dont live in USA, so I not sure if this post is really interesting for you.
But I was very surprised to find this website:
http://www.prosper.com/public/welcome/default.aspx
what do you think about it? Have you tried it?

Do you invest using EUR?

2. deminvest - May 18, 2006

That site is really very interesting. I was thinking of investing on it, but there seems to be only one serious lack to it: they could have simply built a system to sell the credit for a lender to another. They did not so, if you lend money, you have your money stuck for years, no matter how badly you may need them in the future.

When I will have some time I will look on Google if there is another company similar to Prosper which allows trading on those debts.

For now I decided I will not put a dollar on Prosper.

3. Jake - July 13, 2006

Too hilarious. Perhaps the greatest web parody ever. Better than “the Manolo” shoe guy!

Cheers,

Jake

4. deminvest - July 13, 2006

Jake, yes it contains some self irony, but also some truth… Maybe the mix can be a little bit useful, without being too boring!
Specially when discussing about stocks, bloggers tend to represent themselves as gurus who own the truth and who can easily forecast the future behavior of stock markets.

I don’t

5. michelle - July 17, 2006

issue on being a guru or non-guru: one thing we can appreciate are the facts being shared and the facts helping us build on better decisions. however, we have to be responsible in discerning facts from lumpy garbage..lol

6. Pete Kraus, Atlanta - January 31, 2007

Why do you not cite the sources for your material? Your articles look like plagiarised articles from financial magazines. Do you write for financial magazines under a pseudonym?

7. deminvest - February 1, 2007

A smart writer should be totally sincere to the woman he loves and to his reader. Both can make him happy, but both can pose difficult questions every now and then. I would probably avoid answering this question from anybody else.

But you are my reader and I will tell you the whole story.

I am not a journalist. The only place where I write about finance is this blog. For my investments I read a lot of finance press, so I may have taken up their language a little bit.

On one side I am happy that you find my articles professional looking. On the other hand I don’t feel completely innocent.

I must admit that sometimes I have done some cut and paste of some financial press article. I usually don’t do it, but honestly sometimes I could not resist… If you want to tell me which articles you read, I will tell you if I copied or not and I will try to rewrite the copied parts.

I will not do that anymore, because you reader don’t want that I do so. And if I will really feel the urge to cut and paste (they invented computers mainly for the purpose of cutting and pasting!) I will cite the sources.

And to be totally open to you, my reader, I will also tell you how, using copy and paste, you can find out if something on my blog is copied or not:

you copy a sentence of 8 or 9 words from my blog, you put it between “” (example: “And to be totally open to you, my reader, I will”) then you go to Google and paste it into the search. If some copying has happened, magically you will see all the copied articles appear!

It is fun and I like it when you reader have fun; so play this little game with my Blog and let me know what you found out!

8. len - February 16, 2007

citing the material source helps the reader understand the limitations of a data source as bases and somehow there are people who depend on data facts as bases for decision. u started with a very noble reason for doing this and u might as well move on with verifiable data to share. not that we do get lazy sometimes.. lol

9. Vlada Kynsky - September 14, 2007

Hello,

I’d like to exchange link with you. As we both have trading blogs focused on global stock markets I think we can benefit from sending readers each other. Please let me know if you are interested..
Regards
Vlada

10. deminvest - September 14, 2007

Vlada,

I saw your new blog. It interesting and well focused. I may accept to exchange links as you asked, but you should first learn a few things about bloggers community.

1) Netiquette: a comment like the one you posted on Deminvest: “at stockweb.blogspot.com you can find more Eastern European ETF traded also on US markets.” is very close to spam. Every blogger receives many of those spam comments. They are annoying. They are usually cancelled immediately.

2) Collaboration: if you want to comment, you should write something interesting. You know much more than most of us about Eastern stock ETFs. You may explain disadvantages of the ETF we propose, compare it with others, explain differences… You are welcome to put in a comment a discrete link to your Blog , but you should also write something useful to this blog, instead of just telling people to come to yours.

3) Respect for readers: A comment like the one you posted on my About page using words like “we can benefit from sending readers each other” is disrespectful of readers, who aren’t packages sent from one Blog to another. Readers are part of this community. I don’t send them to your advertising packed blog to “benefit” you or me. I will be happy to link your Blog if I find it interesting for my readers, not to “benefit”. You can put some advertising in your Blog (you did), but you cannot consider readers like packages.

4) Respect for an older Blogger. You opened a brand new Blog, which doesn’t even have a Google rating. Deminvest isn’t anything professional or fancy, but it has a Google ranking of 4. This should tell you that it has a lively community and good relationships with other Bloggers. If you are linked by a Blog, which has a good ranking on stock, you will get a ranking yourself. If Deminvest is linked by your Blog that doesn’t have a ranking, Deminvest’s ranking won’t be affected.
You don’t post a spamming comments like this and the one in the About area. You kindly suggest that it may be interesting for Deminvest’s readers to also read what you write, and if you consider Deminvest interesting for your readers, you may want to link it too.

All this is written from an older Blogger to a younger Blogger, as a little advice and an opportunity to collaborate in a nicer way to share more information with the community.

11. Vlada Kynsky - September 15, 2007

Hello Deminvest,

First I am sorry about the way I contact you. I found out your blog and found out as very interesting, not focused only on technical charting as many blogs.
I thought It could be beneficial for our readers to get and share information from our blogs because I think we have similar readers.

Vlada

12. Irfan - December 10, 2007

Hi,
I am new to this blog and it seems very interesting to me, as I am a newbie in investing.
Where do new entrees introduce themselves??

13. deminvest - December 10, 2007

The best place to start for an future investor is on the SEC:

http://www.sec.gov/investor/pubs/roadmap.htm

14. Irfan - December 10, 2007

Okay thanks.
Although I have already jumped into investing.
I would like you guys to have a look at Zimmer (ZMH).
The company manufactures artificial joints and as the number of obese people are growing there stock is doing pretty good.
It went up more than 5 bucks in 10 days.

15. Irfan - December 10, 2007

What do you think about ETFC (E*Trade). It got a major blow. Will it go back up? Maybe it will get sold.

16. deminvest - December 11, 2007

Ifran, I don’t like Etrade at all. They are in a very competitive environment pushing commissions down. They even have to face zecco with their zero cost commissions.

Said that, maybe E*trade went too far down and may recover at least part of what it lost. But nobody really knows.

I usually don’t speculate on companies that are falling down:

we, small uneducated investors, will always be the last to know what is really happening. Trading this kind of stocks exposes us to the risk of becoming food for insider trading sharks, who do “somehow” know what is really happening.

17. bibomedia - February 27, 2008

Have a nice day !

18. Ron - June 14, 2008

“we, small uneducated investors, will always be the last to know what is really happening. Trading this kind of stocks exposes us to the risk of becoming food for insider trading sharks, who do “somehow” know what is really happening.”

boy, is that ever the truth you speak!!

i just found your blog today and i’m really seeing a lot of how i feel in your posts. also, your stock buying strategy seems logical, so i may begin to do that myself.

take care.

19. deminvest - June 15, 2008

Thanks Ron.

gl with your trading

20. Kaku - August 13, 2010

Hi deminvest, I feel really glad to see your site; all the discussions & advices are so intellectual & of great quality. I am sure going to be part of this great community & recommend my friends too. Thank you very much for your great effort! Kaku(india)

21. bubba louie - April 18, 2012

Deminvest, do you have a list/spreadsheet of all your trades and results? I’m interested in how you are doing. Mostly a score of how many 40% stocks you have and the average time it took to hit 40%. Thanks! love the site.

22. deminvest - April 20, 2012

Louie,

I will work on this spreadsheet for you. It will probably be a full workday, about 12 years of trades, on average two a month.

Till two years ago, I have been registering my trades on Icarra.

While I work on the spreadsheet, this link could help get some quick info:
http://www.icarra.com/chartPortfolio.php?id=10&id=2561&compareList=10


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